CSU Classification Standards

Class TitleClass CodeDate EstablishedDate Revised
Credential Analyst Trainee26277-1-200011-1-2001
Credential Analyst I26284-20-197011-1-2001
Credential Analyst II263010-1-198611-1-2001

SERIES DEFINITION:

The Credential Analyst series includes positions responsible for a broad range of credentialing functions that include reviewing, analyzing, evaluating and processing applications for public school teaching credentials, certificates, and permits. Incumbents in these classifications have the responsibility of determining eligibility for credentials, certificates and permits, and recommending their issuance to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing; however, the Credential Analyst II has the authority on behalf of the campus to directly notify the Commission to issue credentials, certificates, or permits. Incumbents in these classifications serve as a campus resource and provide assistance, guidance and current information to students, members of the faculty, faculty committees and other interested parties on matters regarding the State and campus credentialing requirements.

Positions in this series differ from those in the administrative support series by the responsibility of reviewing applications for State teaching, service and specialist credentials, determining an applicant’s eligibility for credentials, and recommending issuance of credentials, certificates or permits on behalf of the campus to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. The work of a Credential Analyst requires extensive knowledge of complex credentialing rules and regulations. In contrast, incumbents in administrative support classifications may perform duties that involve processing applications and related paperwork, but do not have the responsibility or authority to evaluate and approve credential applications.

Positions in this series also differ from those in the Student Services Professional Series by their focus on the credentialing process and related student activities. In contrast, positions in the Student Services Professional Series perform duties involving the assessing, interpreting or influencing of individual student behavior, adjust-ment to campus life and goal choices.

Credential Analyst Trainee:

Under direct supervision, the Credential Analyst Trainee classification provides a training opportunity for approximately six months to twelve months (not to exceed twelve months). During the training, the incumbent can acquire the essential knowledge, skills and abilities to perform work comparable to the work of a Credential Analyst I. The trainee program involves learning the State standards and requirements for teaching and service credentials, as well as learning to process applications, evaluate academic qualifications, determine credit to issued towards credentials and permits, and to interpret and apply the California Education Code and other regulations pertaining to the issuance of various credentials, certificates and permits for public school teaching and service in California.

The length of the training program will depend on the Trainee’s prior experience, but cannot exceed twelve months. Permanent status can not be achieved in this trainee classification. Upon completion of the training, the Trainee is expected to be able to perform the duties of the Credential Analyst I under general supervision. If the training program is successfully completed, the Trainee will be reclassified to a Credential Analyst I.

TYPICAL QUALIFICATIONS:
  • Knowledge and Abilities:
    Knowledge of general office procedures, methods, and practices. Knowledge of the techniques used in processing information.Ability to check and verify complex records and detailed information for compliance with established criteria; write correspondence and prepare standard reports; demonstrate thoroughness and accuracy; interpret and apply written regulations; and maintain confidentiality of information.

    During training, the ability to learn and apply the following is essential: State standards and requirements for teaching and service credentials, certificates, or permits; how to process applications and evaluate aca-demic qualifications and determine credit to be granted towards credentials, certificates and permits; and how to interpret and apply the California Education Code and other regulations pertaining to the granting of various credentials and permits for public school teaching and service in California.

    and

  • Experience:
    Equivalent training and experience involving academic, administrative, fiscal or statistical record-keeping and processing or course work involving the development of analytical skills.
Credential Analyst I:

Under general supervision, the Credential Analyst I is responsible for reviewing credential applications and recom-mending whether or not a credential, certificate or permit be recommended for issuance. Incumbents evaluate academic qualifications and determine credit to be granted toward credentials, certificates and permits; process applications for teaching credentials and permits, rejecting those that do not meet mandated requirements; maintain resource documents that describe all the rules and requirements for each type of credential; circulate and post announcements regarding testing dates, activities and schedules related to credential preparation; provide forms, handouts and instructions related to applying for credentials; maintain progress files on students seeking credentials; announce, schedule and coordinate campus activities and workshops related to the teacher preparation program; advise and assist students and members of the faculty, faculty committees and other interested parties by interpreting credential rules, regulations and processes. Incumbents at this level do not have the final authority to directly notify the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing that a credential, certificate, or permit be issued to an applicant.

TYPICAL QUALIFICATIONS:
  • Knowledge and Abilities:
    Thorough knowledge of State standards and requirements for teaching and service credentials; general knowledge of educational practices in California school systems related to employment of teachers with credentials or permits; general knowledge of school internship programs; and a broad understanding of the credentialing process.Ability to interpret for others and correctly apply the California Education Code and other such regulations pertaining to the issuance of the various credentials, certificates and permits for public school teaching and service in California; to organize and plan work to meet deadlines; to schedule participants for interviews, workshops or teaching related activities; to evaluate academic qualifications and determine credit to be granted toward credentials, certificates and permits; to prepare correspondence, records, and reports; and to establish and maintain cooperative working relationships with others.and
  • Experience:
    Equivalent to one year of experience evaluating academic qualifications of applicants for public school cre-dentials, certificates or permitsorEquivalent to two years of experience processing academic records to determine eligibility for admissions or degrees. One year of college level education (full-time equivalent) may be equated for up to one year of the academic record processing experience

    or

    Equivalent to two years experience performing technical, clerical or secretarial duties involving formulation, revision or interpretation of academic requirements or courses. One year of college level education (full-time equivalent) may be equated for up to one year of the technical, clerical or secretarial experience.

Credential Analyst II:

In addition to performing the full range of evaluation and processing functions of the Credential Analyst I, the Credential Analyst II has the full authority to notify the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing that a credential, certificate or teaching permit be issued to an applicant. Incumbents also may serve as a lead to other staff members in the Credential Analyst I classification or in positions performing related work.

Incumbents are responsible for adhering to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing approved cre-dential program requirements; reporting of credential admission, enrollment and recommendation data report-ing; and maintaining historic credential program related documentation related to formal California Commission on Teacher Credentialing program approvals, credential-related fees and subject matter program content.

TYPICAL QUALIFICATIONS:
  • Knowledge and Abilities:
    Comprehensive knowledge of State standards and requirements for the full range of teaching credentials; thorough knowledge of educational practices related to employment of teachers with credentials, certifi-cates, or permits in California school systems; a comprehensive understanding of the credentialing process; thorough knowledge of school internship programs; and a general knowledge of teacher preparation pro-grams.Same abilities as Credential Analyst I.and
  • Experience:
    Equivalency of two years of experience in the review, analysis, evaluation or processing applications for teaching credentials, certificates or permits.Equivalency of one year of the above required experience may be equated with any combination of the following:Two years of experience processing academic records to determine eligibility for admissions or degrees. One year of college level education (full-time equivalent) may be equated for up to one year of the academic record processing experience.

    or

    Two years of experience performing technical, clerical or secretarial duties involving formulation, revision or interpreta-tion of academic requirements or courses. One year of college level education (full-time equivalent) may be equated for up to one year of the technical, clerical or secretarial experience.

ALL CLASSES:

Occupational Index: O-1
Premium O/T: Yes
Shift Differential: No

Class Code: 2802
FLSA: Exempt

Classification Standard Reformatted: 02-01-2013

OVERVIEW:

Under general direction of the Station Manager, the Educational Television Program Director is responsible for all aspects of programming for an open-circuit, educational television station serving the educational and cultural needs of both the community and the university.

TYPICAL ACTIVITIES:

The following examples of typical work activities are meant to illustrate the general range of work functions performed by Educational Television Program Directors; they are not meant to be all-inclusive or restrictive. Work assignments may involve other related activities within the scope of this classification.

Educational Television Program Directors typically perform some or all of the following duties: determine the program schedule and direct the day-to- day programming operation of the station; work closely with representatives of groups participating in the television schedule to provide information, guidance and advice in selecting or preparing appropriate program, taking into account such considerations as subject matter of the proposed program, audience to be reached, desirable and available viewing time, costs of production and similar matters; maintain continuing awareness of the availability of special educational television programs for instructional or other use in order to secure and provide programs of the greatest possible effectiveness and impact; work with the coordinators of instructional television for both public and private schools to insure that programming is of the highest quality and is appropriate to their instructional needs; serve as a member of and advisor to special curriculum committees on the effective use of television in the instructional process; plan layout out and direct the work of a group of subordinates engaged in the programming aspects of station operations or in developing particular programs; provide leadership in cooperation with the Director of Production in the training of personnel, and in all aspects of production including lighting, camera operation, floor management and similar matters; in cooperation with the Director of Production, oversee and review the work of producers who are responsible for the creative aspects of the programs to be produced locally as these relate to script, casts, props, sets, visual aids, film strips, technical facilities, sound effects, lighting, musical background and similar matters in order to effect the best possible production; evaluate scripts for overall cost and production requirements, estimated production time, number of rehearsals, etc.; edit or revise scripts as necessary for dramatic quality, timing, pace, emphasis, effectiveness or length; and, plan the entire production to conform to prescribed time limitations.

Incumbents are responsible for the quality of all productions. They are also responsible to the station manager for all administrative matters relating to station program production and participate in the preparation and submission of the station operating budget, the selection and training of staff and similar matters. Incumbents establish and maintain appropriate controls to insure optimum use of available resources and may act for the station manager in the latter’s absence.

As requested, incumbents work closely with and provide advisory service to the teaching faculty in the development or improvement of instructional programming for use in the college closed-circuit ITV system. In support of the broadcasting curriculum, incumbents may serve as a guest lecturer during demonstration or classroom session relating to television programming.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

Knowledge and Abilities:
Thorough knowledge of instructional methods and techniques and of the appropriate and effective uses of mass communication media and the ability to adapt this knowledge to the particular needs of a variety of special audiences.

Ability to establish and maintain harmonious and cooperative working relationships with faculty, staff, and students and with representatives of the educational, industrial, cultural or civic interests of the community served; reconcile divergent points of view and to effectively plan for and manage a complex technical operating program; plan, organize and oversee the work of others; train personnel in various aspects of production including lighting, camera operation and floor management; and, develop plans for effective use of television in the instructional process.

Experience:
Equivalent to four years of progressively responsible experience in education television programming and production. Such experience may have been obtained either as a staff member in an educational television station or in a department of educational broadcasting.

A master’s degree and additional graduate study in a directly related field may be substituted for experience on a year-for-year basis up to a maximum of two years.

Education:
Equivalent to graduation from a four-year college or university in a job- related field. Experience which has demonstrated that the applicant has acquired and successfully applied the knowledge and abilities listed above may be substituted for the required education on a year-for-year basis.

Class TitleClass CodeDate EstablishedDate RevisedOccupation Index Reference
Evaluator Trainee263410-1-86NewO-1
Evaluator I26327-21-5610-1-86O-1
Corsortium Evaluator I*935011/1/8110-1-86 
Evaluator II263310-1-86NewO-1

*Note: In these standards all references to the Evaluator I class shall be interpreted to apply to the Consortium Evaluator I class as well.

INTRODUCTION TO THE SERIES:

The Evaluator Series includes all positions involved in the review, analysis, evaluation and processing of information, records and transcripts for determining academic credit and eligibility for degrees and specialized program designations. Depending upon the organizational structure of the campus, incumbents may also provide various levels of information, advice and assistance to students, faculty and administrative personnel regarding specific requirements for various degrees, majors, minors, and specialized program designations.

The nature of the work is focused primarily on responsibility for precise reviews and evaluations of academic records in contrast to the focus in classes in other Student Services areas in which the nature of the work involves assessing, interpreting and influencing student behavior, adjustment to campus life and goal choices.

The primary knowledges and abilities in this series relate to maintaining high degrees of accuracy, thoroughness, integrity and confidentiality. Errors in determining eligibility for degrees or in providing incorrect information or advice may cause serious consequences for the student.

DEFINITION OF LEVELS:

The Evaluator Trainee classification provides opportunity for participation in a formalized, structured program of six months to one year duration to acquire the essential knowledges and abilities for performing academic records evaluation work. Depending on the prior experience of the Trainee, the length of the program is established to meet individual needs of the Trainee in acquiring the essential knowledges and abilities for evaluation work related to degree granting. Upon completion of the training, the Trainee is expected to be able to perform in virtually any campus evaluation unit in the Evaluator I classification with a minimum of supervision. Permanent status cannot be obtained in the Evaluator Trainee classification. Upon successful completion of the training program, Trainees are moved to the Evaluator I classification.

The Evaluator I makes determinations regarding eligibility for the granting of degrees based on knowledge and experience of records, transcripts and official documents in making evaluations against the appropriate criterion.

The assigned workload normally includes a full range of routine, difficult and problematic cases. Work is performed under general supervision and requires a high degree of accuracy. Final reviews for the granting of bachelor ‘s degrees are typically performed at this level. Considerable student contact may be involved in some assignments to provide interpretations and explanations of requirements and how these apply in specific situations. Incumbents

at the Evaluator I level typically provide information and advice to individual students concerning course equivalents, alternatives and options open to a student in qualifying for different majors, degrees or academic goals. Incumbents at the Evaluator I level may assist in training Evaluator Trainees.

The Evaluator II classification is designed for positions with lead responsibility requiring a significantly greater depth of knowledge and ability than that found at the Evaluator I level. In all cases. the Evaluator II has responsibility for resolving the most unique cases, for implementing and planning for changes in policy or process, and for resolving problems in ways that maintain accuracy, continuity and consistency of evaluation decisions for the group being led.

DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS:

Incumbents in the Evaluator Trainee class are distinguished from incumbents in other classes by being in a learning capacity and by performing increasingly more difficult tasks with greater degrees of independence throughout the training period in order to acquire the knowledges and abilities required for the Evaluator I class.

Incumbents in the Evaluator I class, in contrast to incumbents in Clerical Assistant II or III classes, perform similar duties of a significantly wider scope and with greater independence. The Evaluator I class is designed primarily for positions in which incumbents have responsibility with great independence for determining eligibility for the granting of degrees and in the determination of official course credits that meet a criterion. This independence is a significant difference between the Evaluator I and clerical classes that perform similar duties, tasks and processes but without the authority to make official determinations regarding degrees and course credits toward degrees.

Although the Evaluator I classification standards describe work performed only in relation to determination of eligibility for degrees, some positions in the class may, in addition, be assigned to perform duties in the determination of eligibility for admissions. The evaluation work related to degree eligibility is the more difficult and responsible. Incumbents in positions assigned exclusively to perform tasks, procedures or functions related to the admission processes should not be assigned in this class.

Incumbents in the Evaluator II classification level have responsibility to lead the work of a unit of no fewer than two full-time employees. While much of the work performed at the Evaluator II level is the same as that being performed by others in the group being led, the Evaluator II has added responsibility for instructing, guiding, checking and correcting the work of others to maintain levels of productivity and quality.

Examples of Typical Activities:

Review academic records against criteria for degrees; determine relevance and value of credit and standing for status, majors, minors, degrees and specializations; check accreditation of other higher education institutions from which credits were earned and determine level, content, unit value, and grading system; provide students with interim reports regarding requirements needed for degrees; write correspondence to seek records or interpretations of records from other institutions; interpret campus and CSU degree requirements to individuals or groups: advise students individually in relation to interpretation and articulation of requirements, regulations, and other criteria elements; organize and oversee the work of others who perform assigned tasks to assist in evaluation work; articulate course and core requirements with schedules of classes; keep records and make reports; collect, select, organize and analyze data; assist in maintaining the security of academic records.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

Knowledges and Abilities:

Evaluator Trainee:
Knowledge of general office procedures, methods, and practices; knowledge of techniques used in processing information.

Ability to check complex records and detailed information for compliance with criteria; ability to be thorough and accurate in comparing records; ability to interpret and apply written regulations; and ability to maintain confidentiality of records and evaluations.

During training, the following knowledges and abilities must be acquired: ability to review and check transcripts, records and documents for compliance with criteria using specific guides; ability to interpret information from a variety of institutions, including foreign institutions with differing records systems; ability to interpret criteria for determining eligibility and substitutions or alternatives in granting credit for degrees.

Evaluator I
Knowledge of the format and interpretation of course records and transcripts of institutions of higher education; knowledge of authenticating course credits and comparing records of differing formats, such as foreign records; knowledge of campus curriculum requirements for majors, minors, terminal degrees, and special program designations, and knowledge of application of campus resource guidelines for making determinations using various criteria.

Ability to be thorough, consistent and accurate in the interpretation of records against criteria; ability to comprehend and interpret complex regulations or requirements and to apply them in the evaluation process; ability to maintain resources which document and update criteria; ability to explain criteria and evaluations to others; ability to make accurate records; ability to organize work to meet deadlines; ability to safeguard the confidentiality and security of records.

Evaluator II
Same knowledges as for the Evaluator I and, in addition, thorough knowledge of resources and documentation processes and knowledge of organizing and assigning the work of a group.

Same abilities as for the Evaluator I and, in addition, ability to interpret and apply criteria related to unusual cases; ability to organize and manage workloads; ability to explain and interpret the application of complex regulations, requirements and criteria to individual students and faculty members; ability to safeguard the confidentiality and security of student records; ability to be responsible for all aspects of a functional assignment; ability to instruct and lead the work of others in making evaluations.

Class TitleClass CodeFLSA
Extended Education Specialist I5181Exempt
Extended Education Specialist II5182Exempt

Classification Standard Reformatted: 02-01-2013

OVERVIEW:

Extended Education Specialists plan, develop, and provide learning opportunities offered by a campus through extension sessions, summer sessions, institutes and conferences, and other educational programs concerned with delivery of higher education for professional updating, mid-career training, community service, foreign travel study and life‑long learning.

Extended Educational Specialists assess needs for new or additional educational offerings, create and develop format and establish course outlines and content of classes and programs; maintain liaison with academic disciplines of the campus; identify and recruit faculty; arrange class locations and use of off -campus sites; arrange and develop budgets and funding resources; analyze costs; evaluate effectiveness of programs; restructure repeat classes; plan promotion and publicity; direct operational and logistical aspects of programs; and. At upper levels, efforts are directed primarily to planning and launching new program areas requiring new policy formulation, and being responsible for administration of major aspects of a campus Extended Education program.

Extended Education Specialists have limited responsibility for policy changes and received direction related to program priorities and emphasis. Incumbents are responsible for implementing program policy and developing new offerings in assigned program areas and involve creative and innovative aspects of curriculum planning and development of unique approaches to the delivery of higher education.

Extended Education Specialist I – Typically responsible for sub-programs and offerings involving one or a group of related subject matter or discipline areas or several specialized types of operational programs having well-established format, procedures and policies.

Extended Education Specialist II – Perform program planning involving the development of cost effective programs in related as well as unrelated discipline areas or for very large and diversified types of programs. Incumbents in this classification may provide lead work direction to others and assist in drafting procedures and program policy.

EXTENDED EDUCATION SPECIALIST I

Under direction, incumbents in this classification plan and develop content and format of educational offerings in assigned program areas usually related to the same or related disciplines, promote community participation, direct operational aspects of programs, make arrangements for faculty and sites, and prepare budgets for offerings. Some assignments may involve responsibility for content and format of offerings for Conferences, Workshops and Seminars as a single program area.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

Knowledge and Abilities:
Knowledge of the procedures and practices in educational program and curriculum planning; resources of the campus and the surrounding community; and the processes required to plan and construct academic programs and course outlines.

Ability to determine needs for new or revised programs; plan course hours and credit; develop course outlines with instructors; locate instructors and to assist them in understanding and completing contract arrangements; develop budgets and analyze costs; write promotional materials and to develop a variety of promotional techniques; represent the CSU system to the community and develop working relationships; manage logistics of providing classes; and maintain cost information and records.

Experience:
Equivalent to two years of experience in planning classes or programs in a specialized field or area, preferably in higher, extended, or adult education. Experience developing resources, budgets, and marketing plans for educational programs and in acting as a liaison with the community is desirable. Teaching experience in higher or extended education may be substituted for experience on a year-for-year basis.

Education:
Equivalent to graduation from a four-year college or university, preferably with courses in adult education and curriculum planning.

EXTENDED EDUCATION SPECIALIST II

Under direction, incumbents plan and develop content and format of educational offerings of whole program areas related to broad, complex, and multiple disciplines and frequently unrelated disciplines; promote close and continued liaison with a variety of academic offices, the University support services offices and the surrounding University service area. Incumbents have responsibility for all aspects within a broad program area including responsibility for an on-going improvement of quality and viability of the program, as well as for financial planning, including developing budgets, improving cost effectiveness and make final decisions related to financial feasibility of all courses in the assigned program areas. Incumbents are typically responsible for large, complex, and diversified program areas such as Institute, Certificate, Credential, Work-Study, and Work-Experience programs. Incumbents may lead lower level specialists and frequently assist in drafting procedures and program policy.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

Knowledge and Abilities:
Knowledge of the procedures and practices in educational program and curriculum planning in education, and the processes required to plan and construct academic programs and course outlines.

Ability to determine needs for new or revised programs; plan hours and develop course outlines with instructors; locate instructors and to assist them in understanding and completing contract arrangements; develop budgets and analyze costs; develop and implement promotional strategies; represent the CSU system to the community and develop working relationships; and manage logistics of providing classes and to analyze cost information and statistics.

Experience:
Equivalent to three years of experience in planning classes and curriculum for higher or extended education programs and including developing resources, budgets, marketing plans and liaison with the community.

Education:
Equivalent to graduation from a four-year college or university, preferably with courses in adult education and curriculum planning.

Class TitleClass CodeTrack ClassDateEstablishedDate RevisedOccupation Index Reference
Library Assistant Trainee2904N/A9-1-91N/AM-2
Library Assistant I2906N/A7-1-629-1-91M-2
Library Assistant II2905N/A7-1-629-1-91M-2
Library Assistant III2907N/A4-1-729-1-91M-2
Library Assistant IV2908N/A9-1-91N/AM-2
Lead Library Assistant II2895N/A4-1-729-1-91M-2
Lead Library Assistant III2896N/A4-1-729-1-91M-2
Lead Library Assistant IV2891N/A4-1-729-1-91M-2

INTRODUCTION:

The Library Assistant Series includes positions that provide technical and paraprofessional support to librarians and library users at a level consistent with assigned duties and responsibilities. This series is not intended for the use of positions that are performing assignments predominately clerical in nature.

Clerical positions assigned to support a campus library will not be reclassified into the Library Assistant Series unless the majority of assignments – more than 50 percent – are technical and paraprofessional.

The position of library supervisor, which is assigned to the Management Personnel Plan, is intended for persons who are not librarians and who meet HEERA criteria as supervisors of library assistants, clerical assistants, student assistants, and other support personnel. They report to a senior-level administrator and function as administrative supervisor of a significant segment of library operations. A library supervisor will supervise a group of represented personnel.The trainee level is the opportunity for the incumbent to acquire the skills and knowledge of a library assistant I in the course of a formal training program. The training program is developed at each campus and includes pre-established learning objectives and a means of determining whether or not the trainee has achieved these objectives in order to complete the training program.

Library assistant training programs last for no fewer than three and no more than eleven months. Permanent status cannot be earned at the trainee level.

Library Assistant I:
This is the first level in the series. Incumbents in both public and technical services perform tasks requiring a working knowledge of library procedures and policies as they relate to the work assignment. A working knowledge of department and library activities, policies, and procedures is necessary. Incumbents perform work that is routine and repetitive in nature. Tasks are well defined. In most cases, problems and their causes are easily identified. More experienced incumbents may be able to identify the causes of unusual problems. In general, problems will be solved by applying past experiences in handling similar issues with slightly different data. Guidelines are clear, well-defined, and applicable to the tasks assigned. Some employees may exercise personal judgment in interpreting them.

Work at this level requires the employee to choose the appropriate method from a limited number of options. Incumbents are not expected to develop new methods or procedures. More experienced employees may provide some input into the development of new or improved procedures or practices. The library assistant I is expected to be able to provide information to the library user that requires a working knowledge of library operations or to refer inquiries to an appropriate resource person and to use library computer systems as resources. Incumbents may schedule the work of and train student assistants and clerical employees, but they may not be classified in a lead capacity. The majority of assignments (more than 50 percent) are at this level.

Library Assistant II:
This is the second level in the series. Incumbents in both public and technical services are expected to have a general knowledge of library procedures and policies as they relate to several broad functions of a subunit or an entire unit of the library. A general knowledge of department and library activities, policies, and procedures is necessary. Incumbents perform work that is standardized in content and which involves the application of established practices. They may be expected to make decisions about routine matters and use some judgment regarding the application of general instructions. Identifying problems may require investigation. Past experience may not always be applicable. Time and research to identify alternatives may be required. Existing guidelines, while clear and well-defined, may not always be applicable and some judgment may be required to explain them. Independent judgment is required when weighing alternatives, deciding between conflicting guidelines, or prioritizing work tasks. In general, employees will choose their own method of completing a job assignment from among a number of options previously provided by a supervisor. Incumbents may suggest ways to improve current procedures and methods. The library assistant II is able to provide a higher level of information to library users, to use library computer systems as resources, and to render assistance in many instances without referring the inquiry to another person. Employees often provide advice and direction to student assistants and others. Guidance and direction of the work of student assistants or employees |classified at the same or a lower level, in a lead capacity, begins at this level. The majority of assignments (more than 50 percent) are at this level.

Library Assistant III:
This is the third level in the series. Incumbents in both public and technical services perform duties requiring a thorough knowledge and understanding of the library’s collection, classification scheme, catalog, and computer applications, as well as the activities, policies, and procedures of the unit(s) to which they are assigned. An understanding of how the activities of the assigned unit fit into the overall activities of the library is also required. Work assignments are complex and varied, often outside the scope of standard practices and established guidelines. In areas that are not covered by a written policy and procedure, independent judgment in making decisions is expected. A larger proportion of problems encountered are difficult, requiring extensive investigation to determine their cause. Unprecedented problems or ambiguous guidelines require resolution through research and consultation with librarians or other staff members. Incumbents are given substantial independence in carrying out assignments, exercising initiative and judgment as appropriate. They must be resourceful in resolving problems and discrepancies, doing research, developing and improving procedures, preparing materials for library users, and using and coordinating library computer systems as resources or assisting others to effectively utilize library computer systems. The incumbent may serve as a resource person, providing information to deans, department heads, and directors, as well as other library users. The library assistant frequently provides advice and direction to students and student assistants and may provide input to the department budget process. The incumbent may schedule the work of student assistants and, in the lead capacity, guide and direct the work of employees at the same or lower level. The majority of assignments (more than 50 percent) are at this level.

Library Assistant IV
This is the fourth level in the series. Incumbents in both public and technical services perform the most challenging, exceptional, or complex assignments in one or more area(s) of the library. Some incumbents may work in the capacity of a special assistant to a librarian, performing work which does not require the level of education and training of a librarian, but does require an advanced level of competency. Work assignments require a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the library, its collection, classification scheme, catalog, and compute systems, as well as how the activities of each of the various units fit into the overall mission of the library. Incumbents act independently in their area of responsibility. They provide high level support and assistance to librarians or administrators in formulating, developing, and modifying library policies and procedures; participate in planning for accomplishment of future objectives; are involved in the implementation and improvement of library computer systems or other systems; and make recommendations to administration regarding the allocation of resources, space allocation, major budgetary expenditures, etc. An incumbent often serves as a resource person or expert in his or her area of responsibility for other staff and library users. Examples include knowledge of a particular area of academic investigation or expertise in highly specialized computer applications. Identifying and solving problems may entail lengthy, time-consuming investigations and require the ability to resolve differences among the parties. When guidelines are absent or problems without precedent, the incumbent is required to use initiative and judgment. The library assistant IV may represent the library by making presentations to user groups regarding the use of and access to the library’s resources. The majority of assignments (more than 50 percent) are at the most advanced level.

Lead Library Assistant Positions:

(In addition to the responsibilities, knowledge, abilities, education, and experience listed under the corresponding library assistant level.)

Incumbents classified at or above the level of library assistant II may be appointed to lead responsibilities in addition to their regular assignments. When performing lead responsibilities, incumbents shall act as the liaison between a librarian or HEERA designated supervisor or manager and a small group of full-time employees or their full-time equivalent, not including student assistants; lead and motivate the group of employees under their direction; solve work problems, adjust priorities, and make necessary changes in duties and methods; anticipate potential problems and needs of employees; communicate major issues to the supervisor or manager for resolution; and assist the supervisor or manager in personnel-related issues. (In addition to knowledge and ability listed above.)

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
All Levels:

Knowledge and Abilities:
Ability to: work accurately with attention to detail; use discretion in applying rules, regulations, and procedures; communicate effectively using standard English; work cooperatively with others; use a typewriter and/or a wordprocessor, read and write English at a level appropriate to the position.

Library Assistant Trainee:
General knowledge of English, arithmetic, general office methods, procedures, and practices.

Library Assistant I:
(In addition to knowledge and ability listed above.)

Working knowledge of library terminology, general bibliographic forms and structures, library computer applications.

Ability to: apply rules in accordance with policy, regulations, and procedures under vary circumstances; provide standard information on library policies and procedures to library user.

Library Assistant II:
(In addition to knowledge and ability listed above.)

Working knowledge of the activities, policies, and procedures of the area to which the position is assigned and how that area interacts with other parts of the library.

General knowledge of computer applications in the library; the academic library setting; the library’s collection; the system under which library materials are classified; and the catalog.

Ability to: work independently using relevant knowledge to determine the best course of action; interpret, modify, and verify library records within established rules and procedures; understand and operate library computer systems and use the resulting output; understand and interpret library rules and bibliographic standards and apply them with accuracy; and perform a number of duties and administrative tasks.

Library Assistant III:
(In addition to knowledge and ability listed above.)

Thorough knowledge of the library’s collection, classification scheme, and catalog; computer applications in the library; the activities, policies, and procedures of the area to which the position is assigned; the way in which that area interacts with the other parts of the library and the library interacts with the university.

Ability to: coordinate administrative aspects of a particular library function; implement policy and procedures; establish work procedures, prioritize tasks, and modify procedures in the light of experience; resolve problems and perform duties even in situations in which policy is general and guidelines are inadequate; apply independent judgment within the framework of established library policies; demonstrate initiative and resourcefulness in resolving problems; write explanatory materials for library users; assist in the implementation of library computer systems.

Library Assistant IV:
(In addition to knowledge and ability listed above.)

Thorough knowledge of the fundamentals and practices of library services (acquisitions, bibliographic control, information services, conservation and/or preservation of library materials, etc.).

Comprehensive knowledge of the activities, policies, and procedures of the area to which the position is assigned; the way in which that area interacts with the rest of the library and the library interacts with the university; computer applications in the library.

Ability to: analyze and evaluate applicable rules, guidelines, and precedents and use initiative in applying them in specific instances; work with librarians in a consultative manner on a variety of issues; provide support and assistance to librarians and/or administrators; recommend policy, procedural, and operational changes in the area of responsibility; participate in planning; formulate goals and allocate resources to meet those goals; make decisions and serve as a resource person within the area of competence.

Lead Library Assistant:
(In addition to the knowledge and abilities listed under the assigned library assistant classification:) Ability to: act as the liaison between a librarian or HEERA designated supervisor or manager and a group of full-time employees or their equivalent; lead a group of employees; solve work problems, adjust priorities, and make necessary changes in duties and methods; anticipate potential problems and the needs of employees; communicate major issues to the supervisor or manager for resolution; assist the supervisor or manager in personnel issues.

Education and Experience:
Experience requirement is equivalent to the stated number of years of progressively responsible library experience in one or more of the tasks listed in the series definition above.

Education requirement is equivalent to the stated number of years of education or units of postsecondary education.

Any combination of education and experience that provides the required knowledge and abilities may be substituted.

Library Assistant Trainee:

Experience:
One year of general office or library experience.
Education:
No minimum requirement

Library Assistant I:

Experience:
Three years library clerical assistant experience.
Education:
or
Experience:
Two years library clerical assistant experience.
Education:
Two years/60 units.
or
Experience:
One year library clerical assistant experience.
Education:
Four years/120 units.
or
Experience:
Completion of trainee program.
Education:
No minimum requirement.

Library Assistant II:

Experience:
Three years Library Assistant I.
Education:
No minimum requirement
or
Experience:
Two years Library Assistant I.
Education:
Two years/60 units.
or
Experience:
One year Library Assistant I.
Education:
Four years/120 units.

Library Assistant III:

 

Experience:
Four years Library Assistant.
Education:
No minimum requirement
or
Experience:
Three years Library Assistant.
Education:
Two years/60 units.
or
Experience:
Two years Library Assistant.
Education:
Four years/120 units.

Library Assistant IV:

Experience:
Five years Library Assistant.
Education:
No minimum requirement
or
Experience:
Four years Library Assistant.
Education:
Two years/60 units.
or
Experience:
Three years Library Assistant.
Education:
Four years/120 units.

Library Assistant Trainee
Library Assistant I
Library Assistant II
Library Assistant III
Library Assistant IV
Lead Library Assistant II
Lead Library Assistant III
Lead Library Assistant IV

Work Week Group: IN
Premium O/T: Yes
Shift Differential: Yes
Employee Category: Non-Academic

 

Class Code: 9164
FLSA: Non-Exempt

Classification Standard Reformatted: 02-01-2013

OVERVIEW:

Under immediate supervision, in a CSU placement office, the Placement Interviewer performs one or a combination of the following tasks: conducts the program of student placement in part‑time and vacation jobs; assists a placement supervisor conducting the teacher or non‑teacher placement program by registering, interviewing, and advising candidates applying for placement; confers with employers and promotes employment of students.

TYPICAL ACTIVITIES:

The following examples of typical work activities are meant to illustrate the general range of work functions performed by Placement Interviewers; they are not meant to be all-inclusive or restrictive. Work assignments may involve other related activities within the scope of this classification.

Placement Interviewers typically perform some or all of the following duties: maintain applicant files and job listings, publicize jobs available and promote hiring of college students; interview students and determine training and experience, interest, and availability for work in terms of class hours and personal requirements; discuss students’ long- term occupational goals and encourage placement in jobs which contribute to occupational training; advise students on number of job work hours which might be carried without affecting scholastic work; advise students on procedures and personal conduct and refer them to prospective employers; correspond and confer with employers and prospective employers, explain the part-time placement program, determine personnel needs and encourage hiring of college students; secure all pertinent information on available jobs, including wages, hours, and working conditions, and, where appropriate, advise employers of wages normally paid in the areas to students performing the work specified; maintain good working relations with employers, making frequent contacts and determining present and future needs; inform supervisor for follow-up when employers indicate opportunities for full-time employment of college graduates or availability of internships for college students; review and follow up placements with students and employers; record and analyze placements made; where placement is unsuccessful or unsatisfactory, discuss with students and employers, determine causes, and recommend future actions; refer students to college counseling service where appropriate; maintain and keep current records of all local employers and note types of employment involved; develop and modify forms and procedures for part-time placement; confer with faculty on positions available for the student; discuss problem cases with faculty and counselors; prepare analyses and reports of part-time placement; and, as an assistant to a placement supervisor in charge of teacher or non-teacher placement, explain registration procedures to candidates applying for full-time positions, assist candidates in completing placement office application forms, perform preliminary interviewing and counseling of candidates, review candidates’ qualifications with the placement supervisor, refer candidates to positions, maintain job order files, and prepare analyses and reports of placement activities.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

Knowledge and Abilities:
General knowledge of interviewing techniques; working knowledge of modern employment conditions and practices; familiarity with current resume techniques and job search approaches.

Ability to instruct and assist job‑seeking students in the use of modern job search literature, the development of pertinent resumes and dealing with common interviewing situations; conduct a program in part‑time placement; keep records and write clear reports; establish and maintain cooperative working relationships with faculty, students, employers and others; read and write English at a level appropriate to the position; and perform mathematical calculations where required.

Experience:
Equivalent to one year of experience in occupational placement, personnel, vocational counseling, or related work.

 

Class TitleClass CodeRange CodeDate RevisedFLSA
Student Services Professional I A3079104-01-2013Non-Exempt
Student Services Professional I B30792 Non-Exempt
Student Services Professional II3082  Exempt
Student Services Professional III3084  Exempt
Student Services Professional IV3086  Exempt

Classification Standard Reformatted: 04-01-2013

OVERVIEW:

Student Services Professionals are responsible for providing a wide variety of professional services and activities ranging from preadmission to the university through postgraduation. The purpose of these services and activities is to assist students in making successful progress toward their degree objectives; to provide learning experiences which supplement those in the classroom; and to assist and encourage students to utilize effectively the knowledge, skills and abilities learned during their university careers.

Such services and activities may include providing information and guidance to students; assisting students to think through problems and select suitable solutions and courses of action; evaluating student needs and authorizing services; coordinating and administering programs, events, and projects; facilitating student involvement in campus life; advocating the needs of individual students and groups of students to university administrators, faculty and staff; and providing support and assistance to students facing a variety of personal as well as institutional problems, questions and challenges.

In addition, Student Services Professionals may serve as “working supervisors” or lead persons.

DISTINGUISHING CLASSIFICATION FACTORS:

  1. Variety and Complexity of Assignment
    This factor is characterized by the scope of specific tasks required of the position; the diversity of situations which require use of independent judgment due to lack of or limited precedents, guidelines and procedures; the variety and stability of resources which must be consulted (e.g., procedures, manuals, regulations); the number and diversity of program and/or service areas with which the incumbent must coordinate assignments and be familiar; and the level of skill and knowledge necessary to function successfully.
  2. Interaction with Students and Others
    This factor is characterized by the nature and frequency of interpersonal contacts with students, parents, faculty, staff, administrators, and the public; the difficulties typically encountered in person‑to‑person interactions and relationships; the types of persons and levels of positions with whom interaction occurs; and the level of counseling, interviewing and other personal interaction skills required in conducting the person‑to‑person interaction.

  3. Analysis of Materials and Situations
    This factor entails the extent to which the incumbent must review information, documents and situations to arrive at sound conclusions, and to recommend or take appropriate action. This analytical requirement varies directly in relation to the scope of the problems being considered, the amount and diversity of the elements which make up each case to be reviewed, and the availability of precedents, procedures, policies and guidelines which can be used in analyzing each case.

  4. Independence and Creativity Required
    This factor comprises the manner in which work is received and reviewed, and the degree of inventiveness, imagination and/or creative ability necessary. Important elements of this factor include the extent to which controls are imposed on positions by established policy, procedures and precedent; the judgment and independence required in selecting and applying existing guidelines as well as determining courses of action where precedents do not exist; and the extent to which the work requires deviation from standard practices and innovation in the solution of problems.

  5. Decision‑Making Authority and Impact
    This factor is characterized by the types of questions, problems or cases on which incumbents make recommendations, decisions or commitments; the incumbent’s authority for determining appropriate courses of action; the importance or priority of the recommendation or decision in relation to other campus activities; and the impact/consequences of decisions upon the program or campus.

STUDENT SERVICES PROFESSIONAL I

(Range A and Range B)

Under supervision, incumbents perform basic professional Student Services work characterized by continuing assignments in which the primary work processes and tasks assigned follow well established work procedures. This classification encompasses a trainee level (Range A) and a fully developed working level (Range B). While the duties performed at both levels will be similar, employees possessing little or no experience will be placed in Range A and will function, with closer supervision, in a trainee capacity for approximately six months to twelve months (not to exceed twelve months). Upon successful completion of the training, the incumbent is expected to be able to perform the duties of the Student Services Professional I, Range B classification under general supervision. Employees in Range B will be expected to perform with greater independence and under general supervision in performing the duties encompassed by this classification.

Classification Characteristics by Classification Factors:

  1. Variety and Complexity of Assignment
    Incumbents may perform duties in several program operations or services which are well structured and procedural in nature, requiring little or no planning and coordinating of the work objectives and operations by the incumbent. Incumbents may be required to consult resources for which the element of diversity and instability exist at a moderate level. Use of judgment is limited primarily to locating, selecting and organizing information pertaining to program operations and services. Incumbents may perform procedural, budgetary and staffing analysis for a small program or segment of a large program.

  2. Interaction with Students and Others
    Personal interactions at this level are primarily limited to students, are a continuing requirement and are conducted to acquire information to ascertain facts, to provide information, and occasionally to secure the cooperation and understanding of others on matters relating to specific Student Services programs. Typically, only the most basic interviewing techniques are utilized at this level. Oral presentations to groups follow well structured or established formats.

  3. Analysis of Materials and Situations
    Analysis is typically concerned with individual student needs and situations, and involves review of student background and pertinent documents to determine eligibility for various campus services and to assist students to choose appropriate courses of action. Analysis is performed utilizing established guidelines, regulations and precedents. Materials that will be utilized in written and oral presentations are typically reviewed and organized under close supervision or within defined parameters.

  4. Independence and Creativity Required
    Assignments typically are well structured by policies, procedures and guidelines, although incumbents may exercise independence within the established structure in selecting approaches; incumbents work with close direction where procedures and parameters are less defined and/or change frequently. The majority of assignments require general review only, being concerned with methodology thoroughness and results.

  5. Decision‑Making Authority and Impact
    Recommendations made at this level typically involve matters covered by regulations, procedures and established parameters; at this level there is little or no other decision-making authority; decision-making authority where it occurs is well defined and of limited extent, and typically impacts only individual student situations, and is not precedent setting.

TYPICAL ACTIVITIES:

At this level, incumbents typically assist a higher level Student Services Professional within the program area assigned. Such assistance may be to lend direct support to the ongoing assignments of a higher level Student Services Professional (e.g., to assist in the development and administration of policies and procedures relating to the program area); and/or to be responsible for specific and well-defined functions within a program area (e.g., performing needs analysis, advisement of policy and eligibility requirements, and determining award sources as in Financial Aid).

Examples of typical activities are meant to be illustrative of the work performed by an employee with this title. The actual job description may contain specific duties not outlined in this standard but which could not materially affect the classification

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

Student Services Professional I – Range A

Knowledge and Abilities:
Working knowledge of the basic principles of individual and group behavior; research and observation techniques for the purpose of recording, classifying, and interpreting factual information; and the techniques and methods of interviewing.

Ability to gather and analyze data; reason logically, draw valid conclusions and make appropriate recommendations; participate in and contribute to group meetings, conferences and interviews; clearly express ideas and recommendations orally; write clear and concise reports; and establish and maintain cooperative working relationships with students, staff and faculty.

Experience:
None required.

Education:
Equivalent to graduation from a four-year college or university in one of the behavioral sciences, public or business administration or a job‑related field. Specialized experience during which the applicant has acquired and successfully applied the knowledge and abilities shown above may be substituted for the required education on a year‑for‑year basis.

Student Services Professional I – Range B

Knowledge and Abilities:
Working knowledge of the methods and problems of organization and program management; research and interviewing techniques; principles of individual and group behavior; the ability to rapidly acquire such knowledge of the organization, procedures and activities of the specific campus to which the position is assigned; and the basic principles, practices and major trends in the Student Services field to which assigned.

Ability to rapidly acquire a working knowledge of the specific objectives of the campus Student Services program and its relationship to the total campus operation; interpret and apply program rules and regulations; gather and analyze data; reason logically, draw valid conclusions and make appropriate recommendations; present clear and concise information orally and in written reports; and establish and maintain cooperative working relationships with faculty, CSU administrators, student organizations and other private and public agencies.

And For Both Range A and Range B

Experience:
Possession of these knowledge and abilities is typically demonstrated through the equivalent of one year of experience in professional Student Services work at the entry trainee level. Equivalent amounts of graduate level job‑related education may be substituted for the required experience.

Education:
Equivalent to graduation from a four-year college or university in one of the behavioral sciences, public or business administration, or a job‑related field.

Additional specialized experience during which the applicant has acquired and successfully applied the knowledge and abilities shown above may be substituted for the required education on a year‑for‑year basis.

STUDENT SERVICES PROFESSIONAL II:

Under general supervision, incumbents in the Student Services Professional II classification perform moderately complex professional student service work in that assignments typically require the application of both knowledge and judgment in using the principles, techniques, standards, guides and professional skills characteristic of a particular student service program or activity. This is the first level to require: planning; both interviewing and counseling techniques; judgment to recommend solutions to problems and changes in program procedures; and acting as spokesperson within the area of expertise.

Classification Characteristics by Classification Factors:

  1. Variety and Complexity of Assignment
    Incumbents typically have sufficiently broad assignments which require some coordination with other functions within the same program area or within other program areas within Student Services. In addition, assigned responsibilities require some planning of the incumbent’s work operation.

    The problems encountered are generally of limited scope with alternative solutions readily available, although changes in regulations, guidelines and procedures can occur; likewise, situations can arise in which judgment must be utilized to apply existing guidelines and procedures to unusual circumstances. Incumbents of Student Services Professional II positions are expected to use judgment within the area of their expertise to revise existing procedures and to recommend solutions to problems for which precedents may not exist.

  2. Interaction with Students and Others
    Incumbents are responsible for maintaining effective working relationships with a wide range of students, faculty and the general public. Such interactions typically accomplish any of the following: to obtain factual information on which recommendations, decisions or other actions can be based; to explain the basis for recommendations, decisions or actions; to help further the understanding of the overall Student Services programs and activities; to assist students in planning and organizing moderately complex and/or sensitive informal educational activities; and to assist students in pursuing their educational and career goals by providing factual data about occupational and educational requirements related to student aptitudes, interests and abilities.

    Basic interviewing and counseling techniques are utilized in these sessions. Oral presentations at this level are planned by the incumbent and are generally single presentation events covering moderately complex subject matter due to its diversity, frequency of change and/or lack of clear definition or precedent.

  3. Analysis of Materials and Situations
    Analysis is similar in nature to that of the SSP I, but occurs more independently and in a wider variety of situations requiring sensitivity to the meaning of the problems encountered and the potential impact on other Student Services areas.

  4. Independence and Creativity Required
    Incumbents are expected to carry out their day‑to‑day assignments without immediate direction. Work objectives are set for employees but the methods for performing tasks are frequently left to the judgment of the employee who receives only occasional instruction or advice on decisions. Employees independently plan the work, solve problems and take action. Incumbents of these positions are expected to be sensitive to potential problems so that assistance can be secured on matters which have broader implications than can or should be dealt with independently at this level.

    Initiative and creativity are required for situations involving changing guidelines and regulations or where existing procedures and guidelines must be applied to unusual circumstances. Review of the work may range from general to detailed, depending upon the relative scope and complexity of the particular assignment involved. Supervision received generally consists of discussions of problems, identifying alternative approaches and appropriate recommendations.

  5. Decision‑Making Authority and Impact
    Incumbents make decisions within established parameters, regulations and guidelines which impact student organizations, groups and individual students. Within the delegated area of responsibility and within defined guidelines, incumbents determine the level of assistance service to be provided students. With their technical expertise, incumbents recommend change in program procedures; act as spokespersons for the program in their area of expertise; and resolve problems within their area of expertise, and within their area of assignment.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

Knowledge and Abilities:
Working knowledge of the practices, procedures and activities of the program to which assigned; general knowledge of the methods and problems of organizational and program management. General knowledge of research and interview techniques; and of the principles of individual and group behavior.

Ability to interpret and apply program rules and regulations; use initiative and resourcefulness in planning work assignments and in implementing long-range program improvements; obtain factual and interpretative information through interviews; reason logically; collect, compile, analyze and evaluate data and make verbal or written presentations based on these data; advise students individually and in groups on routine matters where required; recognize multicultural, multisexed and multi‑aged value systems and work accordingly; establish and maintain cooperative working relationships with faculty, CSU administrators, student organizations, private and public agencies and others in committee work, and student advising and community contacts; and, rapidly acquire a general knowledge of the overall operation, functions and programs of the campus to which assigned. Demonstrated ability to make decisions and carry through actions having implications with regard to other program or service areas Services Office.

Possession of these knowledge and abilities typically is demonstrated through the Experience requirements below.

Experience:
Possession of these knowledge and abilities is typically demonstrated through the equivalent of two years of professional experience in one of the student services program areas or in a related field; experience should give evidence of competence and indicate the potential for further growth. A master’s degree in a job‑related field may be substituted for one year of the professional experience.

Education:
Equivalent to graduation from a four-year college or university in one of the behavioral sciences, public or business administration or a job‑related field. Additional specialized experience during which the applicant has acquired and successfully applied the knowledge and abilities shown above may be substituted for the required education on a year‑for‑year basis.

STUDENT SERVICES PROFESSIONAL III:

Under general direction, the Student Services Professional III performs complex Student Services professional work characterized by independent student advisement and guidance in individual and group settings. Such advisement involves basic counseling techniques and may concern career, academic, learning, campus life and/or related issues. Incumbents in this classification spend substantial portions of time in advisement sessions of considerable duration and utilize skills usually gained in graduate courses in counseling and guidance, human relations or related fields. This level is further characterized by assignments requiring the application of a high degree of judgment, or persuasiveness, imagination and professional skills and knowledge in a specified program or service area, as well as a general understanding of the interrelationships and the need for coordinated action within the total Student Services program. This level requires considerable administrative planning to develop creative solutions which integrate approaches across organizational lines. At this level, there is also the responsibility for recognizing specific program needs and for developing approaches for possible implementation to meet these needs.

Classification Characteristics by Classification Factors:

  1. Variety and Complexity of Assignment

    Work assignments of this level are generally complex and/or sensitive, and involve multifaceted concerns of individual students, student organizations, administration, faculty, community groups and others. Assigned responsibilities require considerable planning and coordination of the work operations by the incumbent.

    Problems encountered are of varying degrees of difficulty, including problems of considerable difficulty where alternative solutions are not readily available, or where guidelines and precedents do not exist or are not applicable. Incumbents are expected to use judgment to select and interpret available guidelines and precedents, and within their area of expertise, to adapt or create approaches and procedures to fit specific situations. Incumbents are expected to develop solutions to individual student problems which represent integrative solutions comprising appropriate elements of all appropriate Student Services instructional programs.

  2. Interaction with Students and Others

    At this level, the purpose of the personal contacts with students, faculty and representatives of the outside community is to provide or obtain information on problems of a potentially controversial nature, necessitating explanation and interpretation of facts. A considerable degree of tact and persuasiveness is required to achieve the desired results of understanding and/or cooperation. Incumbents of positions at this level must be sensitive to the needs of the individuals and of the groups contacted and also must have keen insight and a sound understanding of some of the cause and effect relationships that exist at the campus.

    Incumbents independently provide comprehensive advisement to students who have problems in choosing, pursuing and adjusting themselves to suitable educational and vocational goals. At this level, the aim is to assist students to identify their problems, think them through, evaluate them realistically, deal with their aptitudes and abilities as related to their particular needs and circumstances, select suitable educational or vocational goals, and implement corrective measures to alleviate skills deficiencies.

    Incumbents utilize advanced human relations skills and abilities to interact with highly visible student groups to help them identify problems, think through the implications of alternative solutions, evaluate past occurrences and reach appropriate conclusions and decisions. Incumbents will be expected to utilize human relations skills to interact with persons with hostile reactions and bring such situations under control.

  3. Analysis of Materials and Situations
    Incumbents perform in-depth analysis of individual student or group problems of considerable complexity. Situations are analyzed thoroughly in search of sound solutions rather than being quickly conceived and/or utilizing standard techniques and devices. Incumbents must be able to readily identify problems and alternative solutions available without assistance from guidelines and formulas. Since analytical thinking must occur during person-to-person interactions, incumbents must analyze individual student or group situations thoroughly, perceive the available alternatives and their implications and must formulate and verbalize this information with those present. Incumbents also may plan, develop and conduct Student Services-related instructional sessions, courses and/or seminars.
  4. Independence and Creativity Required
    Incumbents are assigned ongoing responsibilities and work without benefit of day‑to‑day assignments. Incumbents are required to develop plans and approaches to situations where few precedents or guidelines exist. Likewise, incumbents must adjust approaches and techniques in the face of unpredictable responses and rapidly changing circumstances. Supervision emphasizes overall results and occurs on a case review basis. Both typical and unique cases encountered are subject to discussion and examination of alternate approaches and techniques to be used in the future.
  5. Decision‑Making Authority and Impact
    Incumbents make decisions in individual cases to resolve problems where guidelines and precedents do not exist; independently determine approaches and techniques to utilize in advisement situations, and within established parameters, independently determine campus services and other resources to be provided individuals or groups of students; and recommend changes on varied matters both within and outside the area of specific assignment.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

Knowledge and Abilities:
The following knowledge and abilities as well as those listed at the lower levels in the Student Services Professional series are required for appointment into this classification.

Thorough knowledge of the principles of individual and group behavior. General knowledge of the principles, practices and trends of the Student Services field as well as general knowledge of the policies, procedures and practices of the program area to which assigned; general knowledge of individual counseling techniques; general knowledge, or the ability to rapidly acquire such knowledge, of the organizational procedures and activities of the specific campus to which the position is assigned. Working knowledge of student services programs outside the program to which immediately assigned.

Ability to analyze complex situations accurately and adopt effective courses of action; advise students individually and in groups on complex student‑related matters; determine appropriate courses of action and proper techniques to utilize while engaged with individuals in personal interactions of an argumentative or sensitive nature; interpret and evaluate descriptions and explanations of problems brought forward by individuals or student organizations, analyze and define the problem, draw valid conclusions and project consequences of various alternative courses of action; carry out a variety of professionally complex assignments without detailed instructions; and establish and maintain cooperative working relationships with a variety of individuals.

Experience:
Possession of these knowledge and abilities is typically demonstrated through the equivalent of three years of progressively responsible professional student services work experience. One year in the program area to which assigned may be preferred but is not required.

A master’s degree in Counseling, Clinical Psychology, Social Work, or a directly related field may be substituted for one year of experience. A doctorate degree and the appropriate internship or clinical training in counseling or guidance may be substituted for the three years of experience for positions with a major responsibility for professional career or personal counseling.

Education:
Equivalent to graduation from a four-year college or university in a related field, including or supplemented by upper division or graduate course work in counseling techniques, interviewing, and conflict resolution where such are job-related.

STUDENT SERVICES PROFESSIONAL IV:

Under general supervision, the Student Services Professional IV performs highly complex professional Student Services work in reviewing the most difficult individual, group or organizational problems, developing and recommending courses of action, and implementing proposed solutions. Incumbents in this classification typically utilize a combination of high-level analytical skills and high-level interpersonal skills in working on complex problems from the investigation and analysis stage through the solution and implementation stage. This is the first level where assignments regularly impact other Student Services areas and where the scope of assignments is program-wide.

Classification Characteristics by Classification Factors:

  1. Variety and Complexity of Assignment
    Incumbents must resolve the most difficult program problems, typically involving highly sensitive and complex student group issues or program‑wide organizational matters. Such problems usually involve matters of such breadth that viable alternative solutions regularly impact upon other program areas thereby requiring consideration of elements outside the incumbent’s program areas. Issues encountered are often in conflict with each other and require solutions which sometimes involve changes in guidelines or policies.
  2. Interaction with Students and Others
    Personal interactions occur in the most sensitive and complex group problem situations. A high degree of tact and persuasiveness must be utilized in maintaining effective and cooperative relationships in circumstances which often involve negative decisions and the necessity to persuade others to accept a different point of view. While incumbents may be involved in both individual and group interactions, personal contacts at this level frequently are for the purpose of providing or obtaining information where the issues involved are often incompatible and require solutions which occasionally necessitate changes in policy. The course of action to be taken is almost always discretionary and interpretations made of technical and administrative matters are generally accepted.
  3. Analysis of Materials and Situations

    Incumbents analyze problems of program‑wide scope encompassing many major program elements and possessing considerably more breadth than normally would be present in situations involving individual students or groups of students.

    Such analysis includes consideration of the impact of changes in a program area or other program areas. Incumbents review existing and proposed policies, practices and organizational structure and propose changes or develop full revisions as appropriate; conduct studies and surveys and prepare reports with recommendations based on results; provide analysis and guidance in major installations (office‑wide) of new procedures and systems. Some positions at this level involve in-depth analysis of complex subject matters or fields and the independent development of thorough and extensive written materials for the purpose of developing knowledge and skills of students. In a staff capacity, incumbents may perform major program analysis responsibilities for an entire division.

  4. Independence and Creativity Required

    Within assigned areas of responsibility, incumbents independently plan and organize work requirements and tasks to be accomplished, determine work priorities, select desired methodology from alternative approaches, handle unusual situations without advice or instruction, solve problems and make decisions which have impact on the work of others and the department to which assigned. Work responsibilities are established by assigning overall responsibility for functions to the incumbent with only occasional follow-up review.

    Decisions or courses of action to be taken are usually discretionary. Review is by means of consultation and discussion. Major work results are examined for soundness of judgment and for general effectiveness and adequacy with respect to existing program policies and objectives.

  5. Decision‑Making Authority and Impact
    Incumbents independently determine level of services and other resources to be provided individuals or groups of students where guidelines and precedents do not exist. Incumbents are authorized to make decisions which go beyond individual cases and which establish precedents and guidelines for future situations. Incumbents are delegated a high degree of responsibility for making recommendations involving broad areas of policy formulation and complex administrative action and for implementation of such recommendations when adopted.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

Knowledge and Abilities:
The following knowledge and abilities as well as those listed at lower levels in the Student Services Professional series are required for appointment to this classification.

Thorough knowledge of the policies, procedures and practices of the program area to which assigned or the ability to quickly acquire such knowledge. General knowledge of the policies, practices and activities of Student Services programs outside the program to which immediately assigned; general knowledge of the principles, problems and methods of public administration, including organizational, personnel and fiscal management; general knowledge of advanced statistical and research methods.

Ability to carry out very complex assignments without detailed instructions; advise students individually or in groups on varied and complex matters; determine the appropriate course of action and proper techniques to utilize while engaged with individuals and groups in personal interactions of a sensitive nature; reason logically and analyze and solve organizational and operating problems of one or several program areas; plan, coordinate and initiate actions necessary to implement administrative or group decisions or recommendations; analyze and define complex organizational, policy or procedural problems, collect and evaluate data, draw valid conclusions and project consequences of various alternative courses of action; understand the roles and responsibilities of others and to gauge relationships accordingly by taking into account the variety of the interrelationships, motivations and goals of the members of the organization served; and establish and maintain effective, cooperative and harmonious working relationships in circumstances which involve the denial of requests or the necessity to persuade others to accept a different point of view.

Possession of these knowledge and abilities is typically demonstrated through the Experience requirements below.

Experience:
Possession of these knowledge and abilities is typically demonstrated through the equivalent to four years of progressively responsible professional student services work experience which includes experience in advising students individually and in groups, and in analysis and resolution of complex student services problems.

A master’s degree in Counseling, Clinical Psychology, Social Work or a job‑related field may be substituted for one year of professional experience. A doctorate degree and the appropriate internship or clinical training in counseling, guidance or a job‑related field may be substituted for two years of the required professional experience for positions with a major responsibility for professional, personal or career counseling.

Education:
Equivalent to graduation from a four-year college or university in a related field plus upper division or graduate course work in counseling techniques, interviewing and conflict resolution where such are job related.

Class Code: 2635
FLSA: Non-Exempt

Classification Standard Reformatted: 02-01-2013

OVERVIEW:

Under immediate supervision, the Student Personnel Technician provides advice and assistance to students, campus administrative staff, faculty, and representatives of outside agencies on a variety of financial aid programs.

TYPICAL ACTIVITIES:

The following examples of typical work activities are meant to illustrate the general range of work functions performed by Student Personnel Technicians; they are not meant to be all-inclusive or restrictive. Work assignments may involve other related activities within the scope of this classification.

Student Personnel Technicians typically perform some or all of the following duties: accept, distribute, and process applications for a variety of student financial aid programs including, but not limited to, NDEA loans, educational opportunity grants, short‑term loans, scholarships, and work‑study jobs; provide information to the students on application procedures, availability of funds, eligibility requirements and repayment schedules; exercise considerable tact and judgment in conducting interviews with students (especially those leaving school or changing their status in some other manner) to advise them on repayments and loan reduction options available in certain cases; gather data and prepare detailed and complex reports of either a recurring or nonrecurring nature; assist departments in the selection of students for scholarships and traineeships available through the campus; and screen students for graduate non‑resident tuition waivers.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

Knowledge and Abilities:
General knowledge of interviewing techniques; thorough knowledge of the policies and procedures of the various financial aid programs available at the CSU.

Ability to sustain a working knowledge of the changes in financial aid programs; obtain, analyze and evaluate data for specific use; advise and assist students in selecting and processing financial aid contracts; keep records and write clear reports; establish and maintain cooperative working relationships with students, faculty and co‑workers; read and write English at a level appropriate to the position; and perform mathematical calculations.

Experience:
Equivalent to two years of responsible general clerical experience in a college or university financial aid office which has demonstrated acquisition of a practical understanding of the policies and procedures of financial aid programs and possession of the knowledge and abilities listed above.